RC Basics – RC Driver http://www.rcdriver.com The World's Leading RC Car Website Fri, 22 Jun 2018 21:24:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 RC Driving 101 http://www.rcdriver.com/rc-driving-101/ http://www.rcdriver.com/rc-driving-101/#comments Thu, 24 May 2018 07:30:04 +0000 http://rcdriver.com/?p=474 Second Nature…a term used to describe a task that you perform so often that you can do it without any conscious effort. For instance, operating a computer mouse is something most of us do without even thinking about it. But, put the mouse in the hands of someone who’s never used one and you’ll immediately …

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Second Nature…a term used to describe a task that you perform so often that you can do it without any conscious effort. For instance, operating a computer mouse is something most of us do without even thinking about it. But, put the mouse in the hands of someone who’s never used one and you’ll immediately discover the entertainment value of inexperience. Now let’s talk about driving a RC car. For me, it’s become second nature. Things like knowing which way to turn the wheel and whether the car is coming toward me or going away from me have become instinctive. So, when I see someone driving for the first time, I don’t always realize how difficult driving in a straight line might seem to a newcomer. I guess it’s time for me to revisit the basics of RC driving; time for RC Driving 101!! To do this right, I needed a willing participant… somebody who has shown an interest in radio control cars but has yet to try it. Meet Curtis…an 11-year old neighbor who’s witnessed me ripping up the asphalt with my RC cars on countless occasions. To say Curt was excited to participate would be an understatement.
RC Driving 101

THE LEARNING CURVE
Ready-To-Run kits are available in electric versions, which run on batteries, and nitro versions, which run on a fuel that is made specifically for RC car engines. Since Curt’s first RC experience will be with a nitro car, he will have broader learning curve to overcome due to the fact that nitro cars require more prep time and maintenance. Whether you choose electric or nitro, you need to be willing to wrench on them yourself. Even though Curt’s car is an on-road nitro vehicle, much of what you learn here will apply to electric and/or off-road vehicles as well.

THE VERY BASICS INSTRUCTIONS
Growing up, I followed my dad’s example–when all else fails, read the instructions. Don’t go by that! Your RC car will come with an instruction manual. Read it first! Don’t just look at the pictures. If it’s nitro-powered it will include instructions for breaking-in the engine. Follow them!

RADIO SYSTEM
Some radios are available with more bells and whistles than most would know what to do with, and others, are equipped only with the essential functions. The basic operation, however, remains the same. Since most RTR kits include a pistol type transmitter, like the one we’ll be using, that’s the type I’ll focus on. Most of these transmitters are set up for right-handed drivers, which means you will hold it in your left hand and use your right hand to steer. With the forefinger on the trigger you can operate the throttle and brake functions. Pull the trigger to make the car go forward and push the trigger to operate the brakes.

RC Driving 101 Figure 8

The transmitter’s steering wheel operates just as you would expect–turn the wheel right (clockwise), the car turns right–turn the wheel left (counterclockwise), the car turns left. The tricky part comes in when you have the car coming toward you. The steering may seem opposite when the car turns to your right as you turn the wheel left and turns to your left as you steer right. (The easiest way to get used to this is to drive in a figure eight. More on that later.)

LET’S KICK UP SOME ASPHALT
Always start with fresh batteries in both the transmitter and in the car for the receiver. Extend the transmitter’s antenna, turn the transmitter on and then turn on the car’s receiver switch. Before starting the car, operate the transmitter controls to confirm proper operation. Do the wheels turn right when the steering wheel is turned right? Does the throttle open when the trigger is pulled? Does the throttle close and the brakes engage when the trigger is pushed? Once you’ve determined all is well, it’s time to start the car. Keep in mind that this is not a lawn mower–short quick pulls of the starter cord work best. Pulling too hard or too far could have you sidelined until you figure out how to get the string back in the starter. Trust me… you don’t want to go there just yet. Assuming you’ve followed the instruction manual’s directions to a “T” for breaking-in your new engine (just as we did), you’re ready to go for a spin around the parking lot. Some important info to keep in mind, which is usually overlooked by first-timers, is that the transmitter controls are proportional. That means you don’t need to pull the trigger all the way. The further you squeeze the trigger, the faster your car will go. If you don’t want to go too fast simply squeeze the trigger slowly until you reach the desired speed. When you’re ready to slow down, gently push the trigger. If you get into trouble, such as heading for the storm drain, then you’ll want to push the trigger quickly to engage the brake. Start off slowly by driving in a big oval until you get the feel for the throttle control. Vary your speed to become comfortable with how the brakes function. Here is where the figure eight comes in to play. As you are coming out of the top of the turn and the car is headed toward you, slowly turn the steering wheel the other direction to create the bottom of the “8”. You should quickly get the hang of this as you start to “feel” which way to turn the wheel instead of just thinking about it. Vary your speeds throughout this exercise as well. For a more challenging exercise, try setting up cones to lay out a road course.

HMMM…THAT WASN’T SO BAD
There you have it. The basics of driving a RC car. Pretty… well, basic… don’t you think? As long as you take your time, read and understand the instruction manual and practice often, your driving skills will soon become second nature to you.
RC Driving 101
After a few laps around the parking lot you should be able to avoid hitting your instructor in the ankle with your car.

RC Driving 101
Always pay attention when you’re driving! Sometimes even the smallest rock can turn your low-riding street racer into an uncontrollable 40 mph projectile.

NEED MORE DRIVING TIPS? WATCH OUR DRIVING BASICS VIDEO

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9 Option Parts Almost Every RTR Car Needs http://www.rcdriver.com/9-option-parts-every-rtr-car-needs/ http://www.rcdriver.com/9-option-parts-every-rtr-car-needs/#respond Tue, 03 Oct 2017 13:10:57 +0000 http://www.rcdriver.com/?p=27488 RTRs are the perfect way for beginners to get into the hobby. They will get the user up and running in as much time as it takes to charge the battery. However, many companies have to hit a certain price point which affects what features are included with their vehicles. One of the best things …

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RTRs are the perfect way for beginners to get into the hobby. They will get the user up and running in as much time as it takes to charge the battery. However, many companies have to hit a certain price point which affects what features are included with their vehicles. One of the best things about our hobby is if there is something you want to change or improve, you can with a vast variety of aftermarket parts and accessories. I have tested many RTRs over the years, and have noticed trends among all of them and would like to give my recommendations for the best 9 Option Parts to upgrade.

9 Option Parts
1.Better Battery/Charger
RTR’s nowadays are still looking to get the user up and running as quickly as possible, but this often results in small capacity packs and wall chargers only suitable to them. Ditch that 1800 mAh NiMH pack for your new car and grab yourself a high quality 5000 mAh NiMH or LiPo pack and upgraded charger. You will see the performance of the vehicle come alive as the motor is now provided with more current. With the charger upgrade, you can expect to charge your packs in less than an hour since most of them are customizable to your need. By far this is the best bang for your buck upgrade that will show noticeable improvements across the board.

2. Suspension mods
I decided to lump all suspension related upgrades into one section since there is such variety in many RTR’s depending on price poProLine Shocksint. On entry-level products plastic shocks with clips to adjust ride height are great candidates for replacement. An aluminum threaded shock offers both increased durability and unlimited tuning adjustment with no spacers to lose. If your vehicle has these already equipped, often the shocks can use some fine tuning at the very least. Pick yourself up some softer and heavier springs and experiment with different oil weights to dial in the suspension. Lastly, some vehicles do not have adjustable control arms or fixed links which do not allow proper setup. Most manufacturers and plenty of aftermarket companies generally will offer turnbuckles which will allow for the camber and toe angles to be set, which is extremely important in steering performance and stability.

 

MIP CVD

3. Driveline upgrades – CVD’s

Many RTR’s these days still are using plastic dogbones or driveshafts. These will generally work with the weak stock battery, but if you took my advice and upgraded the battery you are pushing more power through the vehicle now. Plastic can only last so long before it wears out and either breaks or warps, thereby not transmitting as much power to the wheels as it should be. Metal dogbones would be a worthy upgrade here, but I prefer CVDs when available. These components have one side bolted directly within the driveline so there is no danger of them popping out like dogbones may. If you have ever lost a dogbone you know that these are usually worth their weight in gold, I don’t even want to think about how many hours I have wasted looking for dogbones lost in the grass or on the track.

 

4. Higher quality pinion gears
Even if you set your slipper clutch absolutely perfect and baby your car/truck all the time, motor pinions often exhibit plenty signs of wear and tear, especially if a small pebble makes its way in. Even in trucks with sealed spur gear assemblies I have gotten many stock pinions chewed up when running my vehicles in relatively harsh conditions. RTR’s usually come with softer metal pinions and a high quality aftermarket pinion from Robinson Racing usually eliminates any issues and will last as long as your vehicle with proper care. Don’t forget to pick up a few spur gears as well, I like to stick to plastic so the spur wears out before my pinion if foreign objects to get lodged within.

 

5. Ditch that radioArrma Kraton
Thankfully all RTR’s come with 2.4 ghz radios nowadays, but not all radios are created equal. Many of the cheaper radios often lack adjustability and even have problems which may cause your new truck to not consistently drive straight even with the trim properly applied. Radio prices are extremely reasonable and offer plenty of reasons on why you would want to upgrade. Of course any of the big name brand radios will track perfectly straight, but they also offer many adjustments that stock RTR radios do not have. EPA (or End Point Adjustment) is not always included on the cheap RTR radios and can help improve your turning radius if the full steering throw is not being utilized or increase your servo’s life if the end points are a bit too aggressive out of the box. You also get the benefit of having more channels if you choose a higher spec radio. The extra channels can be used for crawlers or scale rigs if you want to operate a winch or LEDs. One of my favorite features of aftermarket radios is the ability to program multiple models into one transmitter. This is a life-saver once you get bitten by the RC bug and trucks start to pile up.

 

Pro-Line Tires6. Better tires/wheels
Some RTRs are better than others, but every single vehicle I have owned needed better tires than what were included. This is not just for racers either. Bashers generally come with pretty hard compounds that sacrifice grip over performance. This isn’t to say your tires will not last as long as the stock set. In my experience the compounds from trusted tire manufacturers are so much better than what is included with RTRs that I enjoy increased performance and equal or better durability. Tires and their compounds require tons of research and investment, so they aren’t cheap but they will fully unlock the potential of your rig 99% of the time. I think it also goes without saying if you plan on racing, this should be your number one upgrade, check out what racers are running at your local track.

 

7. New body/wingPre-Painted Pre-Cut 2017 Ford F-150 Raptor Body (Gray Blue)
Yeah the stock bodies may look way cooler than what you can paint yourself with rattle cans, but generally they show signs of abuse super early compared to a high quality lexan shell. It is quite surprising how much more durable aftermarket bodies are. I remember when I first started racing 1/8 scale my stock body lasted about 2 race days with all my crashes. I purchased aftermarket shell, trimmed the body and painted it and the body still is not cracked to this day. Not only do they offer increased durability, but many offer increased performance with extra downforce and less drag. Slap on an aftermarket wing if your vehicle allows as well, it is amazing how well airflow and the dynamics of a truck/buggy will change with just one part.

 

Hitec Servo8. Steering servo
Many companies generally use the servo as a method of cost cutting, so a higher quality servo will wake up your RTR. The steering servo has a tough job, especially on trucks with heavy wheels. A higher quality servo can provide more torque, faster transit speeds and even offer better resolution and centering performance. The result is you will not have that delay when you input steering into your transmitter. You also will notice that a higher quality servo will not struggle when turning the wheels from side to side. Couple a nice digital servo with an appropriate radio upgrade and you will have a top notch performer ready for the track!

 

 

9. Basher BitsArrma Kraton
I left this section for last because it does not apply to every RTR vehicle, but mostly bashers. When you abuse your vehicle as much as we do (huge jumps, speed runs, etc), it is inevitable that we are going to have some pretty gnarly crashes. When a crash happens, energy is either absorbed or transferred throughout our vehicle and does not always have to result in parts breaking. RPM has been a mainstay in many vehicles ever since I started in the ground based radio control hobby. Their plastics are designed to absorb as much energy as possible, deferring it from more fragile components in your vehicle. They also are generally more beefy than the stock components, so they can handle much more abuse. One upgrade I always recommend are RPM control arms and hub carriers if they offer it for your vehicle. They generally flex a little more than the stock sets, so CVD’s are a great compliment with RPM parts. Of course aluminum parts in the right places are also a worthy upgrade, but be sure to not go bling happy, many times you want a plastic point of failure for easy replacement (much better than bent aluminum!). This is why I recommend RPM so heavily.

WRAP UP
Well there you have it, my choice for the top 9 Option Parts that you should replace on your RTR vehicle. No RTR car I get stays stock for long and over the years I have gotten this upgrade path down to a science. The best part is that the batteries, charger, radios and more are some components that can be shared with multiple vehicles making the investment that much better. Don’t feel like you have to run out and buy these parts right away, one method that many people like to employ is to replace broken parts with better aftermarket part. That way you slowly transform your boring stock RTR, into a fire-breathing beast!

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Get To Know Your Radio – Get Into RC http://www.rcdriver.com/get-to-know-your-radio/ http://www.rcdriver.com/get-to-know-your-radio/#respond Sat, 22 Apr 2017 15:48:32 +0000 http://www.rcdriver.com/?p=26069 Everyone had a first day in RC… EVERYONE! In Episode 002 of our “Get Into RC” video series, we are going to show you the anatomy of your basic radio system. Even though the radio (or transmitter) you may have is basic, it still has a number of parts, functions and trims you should know …

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Everyone had a first day in RC… EVERYONE! In Episode 002 of our “Get Into RC” video series, we are going to show you the anatomy of your basic radio system. Even though the radio (or transmitter) you may have is basic, it still has a number of parts, functions and trims you should know about before you head out to run your new RC machine. Even if you’ve never touched an RC car before, we’ll have you understanding what the radio is about and how to operate it like a pro within just a few minutes. Take a few minutes to watch the video below and Get To Know Your Radio!

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How To Power On/ Off Your First RC Car – Get Into RC http://www.rcdriver.com/power-off-first-rc-car-get-rc/ http://www.rcdriver.com/power-off-first-rc-car-get-rc/#respond Thu, 13 Apr 2017 21:37:33 +0000 http://www.rcdriver.com/?p=24917 Everyone had a first day in RC… EVERYONE! And it’s pretty safe to say nobody started off as a pro. Everyone had to learn about their new hobby, some learned from a friend and some learn on their own. And for some, the extreme basics can still be scary. We don’t want you to be …

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Everyone had a first day in RC… EVERYONE! And it’s pretty safe to say nobody started off as a pro. Everyone had to learn about their new hobby, some learned from a friend and some learn on their own. And for some, the extreme basics can still be scary. We don’t want you to be scared and we want to to have nothing but fun. So we’ve started a playlist dedicated to teaching new RC enthusiasts the basics. In this Get Into RC video, we go over the proper procedure to simply turn on your new electric RC car. Trust us, people need to watch this, we’ve seen so many people turn their RC equipment on in the wrong order. This video shows you how to properly power on or power off your radio system.

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Tune With Ackermann http://www.rcdriver.com/tune-with-ackermann/ http://www.rcdriver.com/tune-with-ackermann/#respond Mon, 09 Mar 2015 18:51:17 +0000 http://rcdriver.com/?p=8025 There are all sorts of items on your car you can adjust, and as you’ve probably noticed, some have more profound effects than others. One area that often gets overlooked is the Ackermann effect. Acker who? At first glance this seems pretty obvious: you turn the wheel on the transmitter and the front wheels respond.

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There’s More to an Arch Than You Might Have Thought

Tune With Ackermann

Words and Photos: Carl Hyndman

There are all sorts of items on your car you can adjust, and as you’ve probably noticed, some have more profound effects than others. One area that often gets overlooked is the Ackermann effect. Acker who? At first glance this seems pretty obvious: you turn the wheel on the transmitter and the front wheels respond. If it were that simple, we’d be skipping this article and you’d be back to building shocks, rebuilding your diff, or some other wrenching needed in your car. This oversimplification of steering hides the fact that there is a lot of engineering and geometry that goes into this seemingly basic item.

In the simplest form of steering (think about those old red wagons most of us had when we were kids), both the front wheels point in the same direction. You turn the wheel and the tires turn around the corner parallel to each other. The problem is when this happens, a lot of scrubbing takes place, lessening the effectiveness of the tires to make a smooth arch. When a car attempts to make a turn, the outside wheel travels further than the inside one. Ackermann controls the difference in steering arcs between the front inside and outside wheel. The goal in tuning Ackermann is to get the car to keep a consistent steering arc after going from off-power to on-power, while trying to keep tire-scrubbing to a minimum. Here is where the problem lies.

Unfortunately, every track has a variety of turns that usually consist of big and small radii and once the Ackermann position is set in the car, you are stuck with its angles. So it is important to find the right balance for the track’s layout where your chosen Ackermann setting will result in the smoothest, easiest and fastest line to drive. How we do that is something that isn’t as hard as it sounds.

ACKERMANN WHO, WHAT?
Ackermann is used rather commonly in car design but many take it for granted and have no idea what it means or where it came from. The fact is that it isn’t just a word, but a name. Ackermann was actually a person who helped develop this technology way back when horse-drawn carriages ruled. It goes even further back than that and was first introduced in 1758 by Erasmus Darwin. If that name sounds familiar, it should because he shares the name with Charles Darwin, who was his son. As you know, Charles Darwin is the guy who caused a bit of a stir about monkeys, humans and evolution. Erasmus Darwin first wrote about this steering system in 1758. His paper, “Erasmus Darwin’s improved design for steering carriages and cars”, would spearhead a new way of thinking. However, it was never patented until 1817, when Rudolph Ackermann patented it in London, and now we are stuck with a name that sounds funny and isn’t truly giving credit where credit is due. So before you go on and argue some points about creationism, let’s get back on topic.

Tune With Ackermann

1. Identifying Ackermann Angles
A: “True,” More and Less Ackermann Steering
“True” Ackermann minimizes scrub by positioning both tires perpendicular to the turn center. This is defined by angling the steering arms so that a line drawn between the kingpin and steering arm pivot points intersect with the center of the rear axle. This gives true Ackermann steering geometry and this means there is no toe angle change on the inside wheel in regard to the inside radius of the circumference of the turning circle.

B: More Ackermann Steering
More Ackermann angle can be added by adjusting the angle of the pivot points on the steering arms so that the point of the intersection is forward of the rear axle’s center. This steering geometry achieves greater angular inequality of the turned wheels, resulting in the inside wheel trying to follow a smaller diameter circle. In medium-to-low grip conditions, more Ackermann is suggested.

Tune With Ackermann

C: Less Ackermann Steering
Less Ackermann angle can be achieved by having the angle of the pivot points on the steering arms so that the point of intersection is behind the center of the rear axle. This geometry achieves a reduced amount of angular inequality between the turned wheels resulting in the inner wheel trying to follow a larger diameter circle. Less Ackermann is desired in medium-to-high grip conditions.

2. Changing Ackermann
Now that you have an idea of what more, less or “True” Ackermann angles do, it’s time to put that knowledge to good use. On most of our RC vehicles, changes are made by altering the angle of the steering links. This is fairly easy and can be done a couple of ways; by changing the inner location of the steering links at the inner mount locations or by changing the location at the outer position which is usually at the steering blocks.

A. Inner Position Changes
Most vehicles have multiple options that let you select the desired position in fine increments. Changing the inner position usually has the greater affect. By moving the inner position forward and creating the most angle with the steering links, less Ackermann effect is generated. The opposite holds true for moving the inner link further back.

B. Outer Position Changes
This is usually the way to make changes on 1/8-scale buggies and other off-road vehicles. Changing positions on the steering blocks is used to fine-tune your Ackermann effect. By moving the link-mounting position forward, it creates more Ackermann effect and makes it more aggressive for tighter turns.

Tune With Ackermann

3. How Steering Arms Affect Ackermann
You’ve learned what the needs are for your tire angles, but there is more to it than that, especially since every corner can be different. As you navigate a corner, your steering input will be less or more, depending on the speed and radius of the turn. Having angled steering arms changes unequal angular movement exponentially. In other words, the more you turn the wheel, the greater the angular difference between the wheels. This is a big deal since without the same angle difference between them, the tires would remain the same no matter how much each tire was turned. For tight, low speed turns, a bigger difference in angle is needed. Of course, the opposite is true for bigger and faster turns. At the same time, both would need to go back to zero angular difference when pointed straight. This couldn’t be accomplished using parallel steering arms, which is why all of our cars have angled ones.

WRAP UP
Now that you’ve learned about Ackermann and realized that the name goes beyond some old guy, it’s time to apply this newly-learned tuning option. Adjusting this is usually considered something reserved for experienced drivers or engineers, but with a bit of this information you will have one more weapon in your arsenal, but keep in mind, like many things, it isn’t isolated. There are a lot of other things that can affect Ackermann on your car such as bump-steer, toe, camber, caster, kick-up, roll-center, etc., so take your time and experiment and record your results. When applied just right, you’ll be amazed at what that magical balance does for your car.

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Get Wired http://www.rcdriver.com/get-wired/ http://www.rcdriver.com/get-wired/#respond Wed, 04 Mar 2015 17:37:13 +0000 http://rcdriver.com/?p=7701 You’ve seen the pictures of the top pro driver’s vehicles, with fantastic installs and that perfect placement. Clearly, rolls and rolls of solder and double-sided tape were used to achieve this level of perfection. Many of the top racers build up new vehicles on a regular basis, or get lots of gear to test, so …

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RC Basics: Get Wired

You’ve seen the pictures of the top pro driver’s vehicles, with fantastic installs and that perfect placement. Clearly, rolls and rolls of solder and double-sided tape were used to achieve this level of perfection. Many of the top racers build up new vehicles on a regular basis, or get lots of gear to test, so installs are a regular occurrence. Like anything, practice makes perfect. What about the rest of us? How are we going to make our gear “Look Pro” without all this practice? Following are some basic steps to help you make your electronics look “Pro on the first Go.”

LAY OF THE LAND
Time, patience and a little bit of common sense go a long way, especially when you start your electronics layout planning. Loosely lay out your gear on your vehicles’ chassis to get an idea of what directions all the various wires need to route. Try a few ESC positions and pay close attention to how the motor wires, battery wires, and receiver wires will be routed to their destination. Typically servo wires and ESC wires to the receiver are way too long. Short tight bundles covered in shrink tubing make a great stealth shortening and you won’t have any lame zip-ties. Also pay attention to the position of the solder tabs on the motor. Often you can rotate the motor by using optional screw holes on the face to help you point the tabs towards the ESC and shorten the wires. Or, in off-road setups where the motor is exposed, get the tabs out of the danger zone. Ever get your buggy/truck tomahawk landed on from the back? Motor tabs can be damaged easily when this happens. Your ESC solder tabs or posts right next to carbon chassis parts or aluminum parts is probably not a great idea either. Always take into consideration what any given item is sitting next to. Minor movements may jolt a wire over into your drivetrain or debris getting into tight spaces can, of course, lead to failures.

STICK IT
After you get your seating arrangement determined, secure the items that don’t need to be soldered on; transponder, receiver, ESC and any extra capacitors for the receiver. Clean the surfaces of the items, and their mounting location. Do not use the household-brand grey tape. This stuff is simply “bad” for your gear. There is virtually no vibration damping at all with this tape and is usually affiliated with oddball failures. Most hobby shops carry good “mounting” tape specific to RC cars. Use it.

GET WIRED
Next up is the ESC wires. Measure 10 times, cut once. That’s been a motto to live by in RC ESC installs for years. It’s not a bad idea to leave about a half to a quarter-inch of “extra” the first time you cut the wires. Then you can fine-tune the final lengths.

RC Basics: Get Wired

We should take a moment to discuss the curse of the backwards battery. Many racers own battery packs that use bullet plugs and not all the battery pack brands use the same location for the positive in regards to the left or right of the battery pack. So racers are forced to leave ESCs with wires long enough to reach both configurations. This is an invitation to cross connections. In a rush, or if a friend is connecting the battery, often times things are plugged in dead backwards. To avoid this, simply leave a pig tail in the battery pack at ALL times. This will achieve two things. One, you’ll be significantly less likely to plug in the polarized plug of your choice backwards. Two, your battery pack bullets will not get worn out by constant in and out plugging. The bullet plugs used all wear over time. The bullet in the battery is not replaceable. Countless problems from “loose bullets” can be found at tracks all over. Leaving the short pig tail always in the battery pack prevents wear, and reduces the “whoops” factor. Some manufactures even offer race-ready pig tails for battery packs. This however, does not look pro at all. But for the racer that has to fit the bill for “whoops” themselves, it’s a wise decision. No pro gets to be pro by missing races due to a whoops.

Once you have wire lengths decided, time for final wire strip and tin. Use wire strippers for this. Countless installers have used scissors or a sharp knife, only to cut the stands of wire. As this is installed, these small loose strands often short to adjacent tabs. Pro installs do no good if followed immediately by a smoke show. Soldering has become a lost art in the RC world, so take some time and practice on your spare wires. Properly tinned surfaces and wires are crucial to your solder joints being able to take the loads and withstand the abuse of a RC car in motion.

NEAT AND TIDY
Finally, route and plug in all the various receiver wires. In many cars, the receiver wires are asked to go under battery packs, or next to drive trains. As pro as this looks, again, it’s inviting problems. In most 2WD off-road vehicles, the wire channels that go under the battery packs generally still allow the battery pack to hammer on the wire. This is done so chassis strength is not sacrificed. Route through the back into tower around the back side of the battery and then over to the receiver. If wires are way too long, the tight bundle in shrink tubing will do wonders to stealth the wires. Do NOT bundle all the receiver wires together. This is only asking for problems. If anything needs to be serviced in a rush, you’ll find it near impossible to trace wires in the “next.” It’s best to try to route each items’ wires separately so if anything does happen to them, it’s easy to find, and won’t affect the other gear installed. Pesky wires can be double-side-taped to the chassis using thin strips. Do NOT use CA glue to fasten wires to the chassis.

WRAP UP
With a little bit of time and patience, anyone can do pro installs. The key is all in the basics, and making sure you don’t create problems just for the sake of looking cool.

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