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Schelle Free Spin Axles For The SC10

Reduce friction and drag in your short course truck
From RC Driver Issue: 134
by Scott Donaldson

Since the advent of the short course truck the most popular class at many tracks has become the 17.5T or stock short course truck class. Anytime you limit the horsepower of a car or truck you need to fi nd speed elsewhere. One of the easiest ways to pick up speed is to reduce friction and binding, which is exactly what Schelle Racing Innovations, the brainchild of Kurt Wenger, looks to accomplish with their new Freespin front axles. These axles are designed to reduce the binding on the front bearings when the wheel nuts are fully tightened, which in theory will allow the front wheels to spin more freely and should yield higher top speeds. We’ve got our SC10.2 on our bench ready to install these new axles in our truck.

It is hard to believe that something this simple can make a huge difference but not only can these new axles reduce the friction on your bearings but also help your bearings last longer. In addition to what is included in the bag you’ll want to have some blue thread lock handy, too.

1 Before starting the installation we’ll need to remove the original wheels, hexes and axles.

1 Before starting the installation we’ll need to remove the original wheels, hexes and axles.

IMG_9706.tifxxx2 Taking the kit out of the packaging we see the two axles, a few shims and the retaining screws. Pretty simply but very effective.
IMG_9707.tifzxxxx3 Once you have the front wheel off of the stock axles remove the front wheel hexes, too.
IMG_9709.tifxxx4 A cross pin holds the axle in place and also engages the wheel hex. Use a needle nose to slide the pin out of place but set it aside; we’ll use it again later.
IMG_9710.tifxxx5 It will be much easier to swap axles by removing the steering knuckles from the truck. Remove the small cap head screw from the bottom of the C-hub to slide the hinge pin out.
IMG_9712.tifxxx6 With the steering knuckle off of the truck you will remove the stock axle and kit bearings. While you have everything apart it would be a great time to clean your bearings
IMG_9716.tifxxx7 With the Schelle axles ready for installation the parts and pieces will go together in a very similar fashion to the kit axles. Here is a view of the Schelle axle (left) and the stock axle (right).
IMG_9721.tifxxx8 Clean your hubs before you bolt everything together. If there’s any mushrooming to the molded composite in your hubs or other distortion you may even want to replace the hubs with new ones.
9 Getting the bearings aligned properly in the steering knuckle is as important as anything else. If the bearings are not straight it can also cause additional side loading and binding.
IMG_9723.tifxxx10 It is now time to get things assembled. Slide the bearings into place and insert the axle through the bearings. Slide the appropriate shims onto the back of the axle.
IMG_9725.tifxxx11 Use a small amount of thread lock on the screw that is installed on the back of the axle. Less is definitely more here.
IMG_9726.tifxxx12 Use a small amount of thread lock on the screw that is installed on the back of the axle. Less is definitely more here.
IMG_9730.tifxxx13 Before you reinstall the steering knuckle, use your wheel to hold the wheel hex so you can tighten the rear screw completely. This will prevent marring your hex like pliers might.

14 Time to put everything back on the truck and finish the other side! In just a few minutes you have really freed up the front bearings and improved how efficiently it will roll through the corners and down the straights!

14 Time to put everything back on the truck and finish the other side! In just a few minutes you have really freed up the front bearings and improved how efficiently it will roll through the corners and down the straights!

If you want to take your car to the next level and are uncertain of how to install aftermarket parts, this is the column for you. Each month we will show how to install option parts on various vehicles. Although the parts and cars we feature may not match your particular ride, the instructions may help guide you in upgrading your machine. If you have a suggestion for an option part you’d like to see installed, email your suggestion to editors@rcdriver.com

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